top of page

Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus)


Cornflower

Effect:

Uric acid-producing, slightly constipating, expectorant, appetite-stimulating, antipruritic, astringent, anti-rheumatic


Areas of application:

Eye inflammation, conjunctival catarrh, cough, mild diarrhea, headache, jaundice, kidney and bladder problems, for blood purification, wounds, nosebleeds, has a beneficial effect on brain activity, fever, breast problems, menstrual disorders, white discharge, constipation, headache, dandruff


Plant parts used:

Petals


Collection time:

May to July


To find:

Protected plant, is rarely found in grain fields today.


Ingredients:

Bitter substances, tannins, dyes, mucus, salts, flavonoids, anthocyanin, wax


Other:

☕ Tea: Pour 1/4 liter of boiling water over 2 teaspoons of flowers and let stand for 10 minutes. Then strain and drink. 3 cups per day are sufficient.


The cornflower is an annual plant and can grow between 20 and 100 cm high. The stem is upright, angular, simple or branched at the top. He also has loose tomentose hair. The alternately arranged leaves have loose gray tomentose hairs. The lowest stem leaves are linear-lanceolate with pointed upper ends. The remaining stem leaves are linear and usually entire. The cup-shaped inflorescences stand above inflorescence shafts in an open, rounded zymous inflorescence. The outer bracts are green and egg-shaped, whereas the inner bracts are purple and elongated. The tubular flowers vary in blue, but can also be white, pink or purple.


The flowers produce an edible blue dye that is used to color sugar and confectionery.


In the past, cornflower was also used as smoking tobacco.


On St. John's Day you tie the cornflower in wreaths, then you look through it and say "John's fire, strengthen my eyelids so that I can see you again in the year


Hildegard von Bingen: The blue cornflower is excellent for red eyes and all other hot-tempered ailments. It is also used for evil, rotten wounds and damage, the juice expressed in it. The juice is good against smallpox.

0 views0 comments

Related Posts

See All
bottom of page